Writers Read

A writer reads. Not all readers love to write, but all writers love to read. And the great ones read several different genres and styles. The most important thing to understand about writing well; you must read a lot. And often.

W. Alexander studies Creative Writing at Liberty University. He lives in Wolfeboro, New Hampshire.

I am not talking aptitude for writing essays. That is easy. Writing creative fiction or creative non-fiction, means you cannot, for example, overuse determiners and transitions like you would with a school essay or professional email. So, scratch what you have been taught up to this point. Do not just take my word for it. Grab any creative book. Fiction or nonfiction, it does not matter. Open it to any page. Circle all transitions and determiners you see. Find any? Yeah, I told you. They rarely show up. A professor of mine advises keeping them down to one or two per page (in story telling). Now compare that with your writing style. I know, it sucks to see it. But you are welcome. For now on, you will write better fiction or creative nonfiction. This tip alone will improve your writing immediately.

I promise what you are trying to convey will stand on its own. Obviously, I am using determiners and transitions right now. That is because I am not writing poetry or a story. I am writing a formal blog post on why you should read and what to watch for. Actors notice great acting. Writers notice great writing. Noticing means you know something about what you see. When you read, watch each sentence like an actor watches another’s hands. Notice pacing. Rhythm. All capable writers are masters of noticing. Our lives are devoted to observing finer details. See, your OCD is a blessing after all.

Noticing means you know something about what you see.

W. Alexander

I wish there were other quick tips to improve your writing. But even the advice just given, might prove difficult to implement. At first. The best way to improve your writing is to read, often. Not one book a month, but four or five or more. Tiger Woods is a famous golfer whom is universally recognized as one of the games greatest athletes to swing a driver. He boasts that before he plays a round a golf on any given day, he hits one thousand balls. Reading is like going to the driving range before playing eighteen holes. It can be a great warm up. How could anyone be a great story teller, if they do not read stories? The answer is, any writer’s whom do not love to read, end up editors. Or worse, sales people. I shutter. That is joke. But one thing is certain, If you do not read, you are not a writer. You might be a great school paper writer, but a far cry from a novelist.

Read. Read. Read. Read some more. And read across styles and genres. Immerse yourself into poetry (which will teach you everything), fiction, creative nonfiction, etcetera. Manuals might be the only exception. But even they will prove useful to the creative. Read everything.

I hope this blurb of mine helps. Classes are going well and I enjoy sharing what I learn with all of you. Tell me what you think? Maybe you have an idea about a topic I should cover? Tell me what you are reading? I want to hear from you!

I am currently reading Les Miserables. You can follow what I am reading on Goodreads.

A Treatise On Loving One Another

“It is the obligation of mankind to love one another. Love can be a visible comfort to all by something as simple as wearing your mask.” W. Alexander

Writers Read

Not all readers love to write, but all writers love to read.

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4 Comments on “Writers Read”

  1. Well, I love to read and love to write- I actually am writing books myself, which are still being worked on. I love to read mostly fantasy and classics

    Here is one writing advice- just write, don’t think about it. Works for the 1st draft, and a good way to get started.

    Liked by 1 person

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